What's the meaning of 'doch'?

Hello! I was watching the show ‘SOKO Hamburg’ (Hamburg Homicide) and there appeared the word ‘doch’, which I can’t figure out how or when to use it. I was wondering if someone could explain it to me!

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Answering a question or statement with the word “doch” is a way to say that you don’t agree with the other one. There is no word in English that has the exactly same meaning.

To understand it better, I give you some examples:

A: Du darfst dort nicht parken. :red_car:(you are not allowed to park there.)
B: Doch, dort ist es erlaubt. (yes, you are.)

A: Hast du mir keinen Apfel übrig gelassen? :apple: (Did you leave me not a single apple?)
B: Doch, einer ist noch da. (There is still one there.)

A: Kannst du das Licht nicht anlasssen? :bulb: (Can’t you let the light on?)
B: Doch, das kann ich. (Yes, I do.)

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“Doch” gives me a bit of a headache too, to be honest :sweat_smile:
Corinna’s answer is definitely one of the uses of the word, but I’ve also seen it used in other contexts outside of positive answers to negative questions. The meaning is still similar, it’s still used to counter a statement of thought.
For example, if I said “Es gibt doch einen Apfel” :apple: , that would mean that there is indeed an apple, although I though there wasn’t one.

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It is used to say “yes”, too. To confirm something

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